The 121 hectare farm known as Wessex Hundred, is home to The Williamsburg Winery. The use of Hundred to name a property dates to the Colonial era and describes parcels of land sufficient to support a hundred families.

It is said that when you visit Wessex Hundred today, you can feel the drumbeat of history as it unfolded on these grounds. The events and the people who played pivotal roles in the rich history of Williamsburg live on through the products the winery creates today.

Patrick Duffeler

Williamsburg Winery owner, Patrick Duffeler

In 1983, Patrick and Peggy Duffeler, after an exhausting search covering 52 farms and plantations, came upon the 121 hectares that would become home to The Williamsburg Winery. Planting of the vineyards began in 1985, and the first harvest was in 1987.

Noted wine educator Kevin Zraly has said that The Williamsburg Winery makes “some of the Best Wines in the World’.

Patrick Duffeler was born in Belgium and educated in the United States, earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics & Finance from the University of Rochester, New York.

The Vineyards
Wessex Hundred, home to The Williamsburg Winery, is an agricultural setting where there is a diverse use of the land. Of the 130 hectares, 111 hectares are dedicated to the Williamsburg Conservancy, whereby the identified parcels will remain undeveloped, precluding commercial development of the land in perpetuity.

Winemaker Matthew Meyer

Winemaker Matthew Meyer

The Winemaker
Born in the UK, Matthew Meyer studied Oenology and Viticulture at the prestigious University of California at Davis and spent time working in Napa Valley, California. His resume includes tenure working for some of America’s most prestigious wineries: Heitz Wine Cellars and Grgich Hills.

Matthew is uncompromising with his wines. If a harvest does not yield the quality of fruit needed to produce one of his signature wines, the winery simply will not produce that vintage. It is an unyielding policy, and it ensures that every wine bearing Matthew’s handprint will not simply be a great regional wine, but one that can compete on the world stage.

 

The Wines